Pipe History

The Advent of the Briar Pipe
It looked good, both for its colour as well as for its grain
Waiting for a Root - Part X
Not so much as visible for all to see, but invisible, underground: the strange, round root of a Mediterranean shrub
Simmering Experiments - Part IX
Take a common, medium-length English clay pipe and divide it into two parts, leaving around a third of the stem attached to the bowl...
Two Different Pipes - Part VIII
In the eighteenth century, crudely-fashioned, white clay pipes with a ten-centimetre long, slightly curved stem, with a hole size less than six centimetres, or even smaller, ladle-like models were unearthed.
A World of Pipes - Part VII
Clay pipes had appeared in London by 1573, but little is known about those that were brought to England in 1586 by the colonists from Virginia.
Pipes Conquer the World - Part VI
Forests, prairies and deserts, rivers and lakes, hills, mountains and plains; herds of wild animals and proud, red-skinned men: this was how the first European settlers saw North America.
Pipe Smoking swept throughout Europe - Part V
Thirty-two kilometres, around seventeen nautical miles, separate Dover from continental Europe, and continuing further north you come into flat, low-lying, water-logged land...
Yet Tobacco Outlived the King - Part IV
The text revealed a literary bent, but the intent was plainly to launch a vehement and acrimonious attack on the current fashion through the use of rigorous discourse...
Then the Tobacco Went Up in Smoke - Part III
Word had it that a fleet had anchored in the port, and what a fleet, just back from the Americas!
From the New World to the Old Continent - Part II
Thus, Columbus did not bring tobacco with him...
Origins of the Pipe - Part I
An object does not magically appear...

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